Rubrics Revisited – From Bloom’s to Beyond

The challenge of writing rubrics is in selecting the appropriate type (as explained in colleague Sarah’s 2016 post,  “For the Love of Rubrics” ), and then in determining the levels of proficiency and the standards or criteria that comprise each level. With rubrics, precision in language is very important: what are the exact intended learning outcomes? What discrete action or…

The Digital Native Debate

We learn about things by naming them so that they can be distinguished from one another. That usually involves some abstraction. After all, things are complicated. Things are, themselves, made up of many things. Even worse, differences between one thing and another are often difficult to isolate, quantify, or even describe. People debate. They say,…

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Portfolios and Authentic Learning

In an earlier post , I wrote about our Instructional Design work with three of our online instructors in the MSEd Literacy concentration. This mapping and redesign project spurred enthusiastic discourse with both faculty and program managers about the role of authentic assessment in our graduate courses. These conversations led quite naturally to discussions about the role…

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Connecting People in Online Classrooms

We all dream of some sort of seamless integration of a myriad of tools (or a myriad of features) that allow us to connect and perform certain tasks. Text, voice, video, real-time and recorded, presentation mode, all-platform, aesthetically pleasing, easy to set up and use, free of course, and with on-demand tech support are primarily…

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Webinar: Fostering Instructor Presence

Last week we gave a webinar on fostering instructor presence using announcements, discussion, and feedback.

The panelists were Becky Christian, Christine Baumgarthuber and myself. We had a good time, and those in attendance asked good questions of us.

We’re happy to present the recording of that webinar here, today.

Teaching Online: 5 Tips for Concise Writing

In my last post, I discussed the importance of writing clear, concise instructions . Our online students are busy professionals, so we owe it to them to be as straightforward and unambiguous with our language as possible.   Nonetheless, writing concisely can be a challenge. Even the most seasoned Instructional Designers wrestle with the balance of delivering succinct but comprehensive content.  …

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WEBINAR – Providing Effective Student Feedback

One of the keys to engaging online learners and facilitating critical thinking is providing students with timely, meaningful, and actionable feedback. Webinar: Providing Effective Student Feedback Good feedback is: Timely Instructional Consistent Good feedback also: Highlights a specific knowledge or skill Focuses on thinking (not writing mechanics) Moves a student’s work forward Provides a model…

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Writing Discussion Forum Prompts

Discussion forums are a hallmark of asynchronous online courses like those at UNE. Previous posts on this site have offered an excellent introduction to Best Practices for Discussion Board Facilitation , and an overview of current conversations around learning outcomes and instructional implications of online discussion forums. In this post, I aim to provide a closer look by offering practical tips for writing discussion forum prompts and instructor posts…